Where the Candidates Stand On Energy: Republican Nominee for US Senate from Georgia David Perdue

In this blog, we examine the policies and positions of David Perdue, the Republican nominee for Georgia’s Class II U.S. Senate seat. Also in this series we profile Jon Ossoff, the Democratic nominee for Georgia’s Class II U.S. Senate seat. Neither candidate secured 50% of the vote in the November 3, 2020 general election, so they advance to a January 5, 2021 runoff. Note: more than 20 candidates candidates ran in the open primary for Georgia's Class III U.S. Senate seat to fill the remaining two years of former Sen. Johnny Isakson's term. On November 3, 2020, no candidate received more than 50% of the vote and so the top two candidates - Raphael Warnock and Kelly Loeffler - will advance to a run off on January 3, 2021. Profiles of Warnock and Loeffler are also covered in this blog series.

Jennifer Rennicks and Guest Blog | August 6, 2020 | Elections, Energy Policy, Georgia

This post is part of a series of blogs examining where 2020 Southeastern candidates for state and federal offices stand on key energy and climate issues. Note: The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy does not support or oppose candidates or political parties. Links to reports, candidate websites and outside sources are provided as citizen education tools.

READ THE  ‘WHERE THE CANDIDATES STAND’ BLOG SERIES

In this blog, we examine the policies and positions of David Perdue, the Republican nominee for Georgia’s Class II U.S. Senate seat. Also in this series we profile Jon Ossoff, the Democratic nominee for Georgia’s Class II U.S. Senate seat. Neither candidate secured 50% of the vote in the November 3, 2020 general election, so they advance to a January 5, 2021 runoff.

Note: more than 20 candidates candidates ran in the open primary for Georgia’s Class III U.S. Senate seat to fill the remaining two years of former Sen. Johnny Isakson’s term. On November 3, 2020, no candidate received more than 50% of the vote and so the top two candidates – Raphael Warnock and Kelly Loeffler – will advance to a run off on January 3, 2021. Profiles of Warnock and Loeffler are also covered in this blog series.

Perdue has held this U.S. Senate seat since 2015. Prior to elected office, Perdue was a management consultant and the former CEO of both Reebok and Dollar General. He earned a degree in industrial engineering from Georgia Tech and a Master’s in operations research from Georgia Tech. 

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

In 2019, solar firms sought help from both Georgia Senate offices with regard to solar tariffs, but Perdue’s office did not weigh in on the decisions.

Climate Change

Perdue has been an outspoken climate denier and, in 2015, voted against a Senate resolution that affirmed that climate change is real and that human activities contribute to it. In 2019, Perdue dismissed the Green New Deal as a “socialist wish list.

Referring to climate change, Perdue said “The EPA is really overreaching and damaging entire industries. We’ve got to get some common sense back in Washington- in science, there’s an active debate going on.”

Perdue supported the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement, and was one of 21 senators to send a letter to President Trump “calling for the United States to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement.”

Electric Transportation

We were unable to confirm the candidate’s position on this energy-related issue in published media, public records, or the campaign website.

Energy Equity and Energy Burden

We were unable to confirm the candidate’s position on this energy-related issue in published media, public records, or the campaign website.

High-Risk Energy (Coal, Nuclear, Oil, Gas)

Perdue has expressed his support for nuclear energy in general and Plant Vogtle in particular. About nuclear energy, Perdue said, “To realize our full energy potential, we need a renewed commitment to domestic nuclear energy. It’s a win for our economy because it will create jobs and capital. On top of that, it’s an emission-free energy source that has bipartisan support.

In regards to Plant Vogtle, Perdue felt that it was “an incredible opportunity for our state and our country to finally be a leader in nuclear energy. I am encouraged that all parties involved have found a path forward for this critical project.”

In relation to fossil fuels, Perdue opposed the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan. Perdue has also praised the approval of Keystone XL and the saving of coal jobs.

Perdue supports the coal industry, saying it is integral to the country’s economic growth. Perdue has also said, about coal, “The coal industry has already been devastated by this regulatory mandate and I’m encouraged that the justice system has acted to bring balance back to the separation of powers. It’s time for President Obama to stop crippling the coal industry and start focusing on our nation’s energy independence.”

If you are interested in learning more about where your state’s candidates for federal and state office stand on energy, click here to access the entire 2020 blog series. The voter registration deadline for the U.S. Senate runoff elections in Georgia is December 7 and early voting begins December 14, 2020. Election Day for all runoff elections is January 5, 2021. For voting information in Georgia, including updates about the impact of COVID-19 on voting, click here

READ THE ‘WHERE THE CANDIDATES STAND’ BLOG SERIES

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This blog was researched and co-written by Suzanne Hollis, a rising junior at the University of North Carolina studying environmental science quantitative energy systems and physics. Suzanne is from Atlanta, Georgia and is a summer intern with the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy.

Jennifer Rennicks
Since 2006 Jennifer has worked with the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy Action Fund to to advance stronger federal, state, and utility clean…
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